.NET Core RC 2 Available Now

Microsoft announces the release of .NET Core RC2. You will be able to build ASP.NET Core, console apps and class libraries for Windows, OS X and Linux. RC2 is a major update from the November RC1 release.

Microsoft announces the release of .NET Core RC2. You will be able to build ASP.NET Core, console apps and class libraries for Windows, OS X and Linux. RC2 is a major update from the November RC1 release, which includes new APIs performance and reliability improvements and a new set of tools.
 
You can install .NET Core SDK 1.0 Preview 1 now (including .NET Core RC2), on Windows, OS X and Linux. You will also be able to use it with Docker.
 
You can use .NET Core RC2 with a variety of editors and IDEs:
  • In Visual Studio 2015 Update 2
  • In Visual Studio Code with the C# extension, now with debugging!
  • Eventually, in your favorite Omnisharp-enabled editor
Coming soon: 
  • Deploy .NET Core RC2 apps to Azure Websites
  • Acquire .NET Core RC2 with RedHat Enterprise Linux yum installer
Microsoft states,
 
“We’ve been working directly with a number of customers who are hosting RC1 in production today, on Windows and Linux. Thanks for using RC1! Some of those customers have already moved to RC2, also in production."
 
Microsoft has current released three components (release notes given below).
  • .NET Core RC2
  • ASP.NET Core RC2
  • .NET Core RC2 SDK Preview 1
Microsoft has made some major changes to .NET Core SDK, which is formerly known as DNX since RC 1.
 
These changes were fairly significant, and the company is planning to make additional changes before the final release of the SDK. As a result, the company has opted to call the SDK a preview release. “While that may sound likes a concern, the SDK is typically only used and development time, not in production, and so changes to the SDK should not affect running applications.”
 
Microsoft states, 
 
“.NET Core and ASP.NET Core have improved significantly since RC1. We’ve added features and improved performance and reliability. RC1 was “Go Live” and so is RC2. “Go Live” means you can call Microsoft Support for help with issues.”
 
Microsoft has also added support for a growing number of operating systems,. The company has started out the project with a plan in order to support .NET Core on Windows OS X and Linux.
 
Close watchers of the coreclr and corefx projects will have noticed that the platform support has been growing steadily. .NET Core RC2 is supported on the following platforms.
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2
  • Centos 7.1
  • Debian 8.2+
  • Ubuntu 14.04 (16.04 support is coming at RTM)
  • Linux Mint 17+
  • OS X 10.11
  • Windows 7+ / Windows Server 2012 R2+
  • Windows Nano Server TP5
You typically start .NET Core development by installing the .NET Core SDK. The SDK includes enough software to build an app. The SDK provides you with both the .NET Core Tools and a copy of .NET Core. As new versions of .NET Core are made available, you can download and install them without needing to get a new version of the tools.
 
You can now also have multiple versions of the .NET Core tools on your machine, which can be important for continuous integration and other scenarios. Mostly you will have just one copy of the tools, as doing so will provide you with a simpler experience.
 
For more information check the official blog.

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